This post is a quick look at one part of the process of Colouring an image with multiple blend modes and coloured layers. It is just a brief look at a working image of how there are no set rules about which blend modes to choose when trying to colour an image. Its what works best for that image.

Varying the opacity and blend modes and where you brush the colour can vary the results. It is best to play with the settings and colours and see what works best and most realistic. Colouring with a rigid colour stack with each coloured layer set to “colour” will not get you a well-coloured or well-toned image. Experiment and experiment some more. Have fun!

A very quick illustration of how colouring an image with multiple blend modes which makes a more realistic colouring process. By applying a dense colour with “multiply” and with the “colour” on top, it can change the way a colour looks. For example, light blue can easily become dark blue using this method. The similarity you could lighten a colour with a “screen” or “lighten” layer and then add another layer on the top to change the effect as needed. Using a build of layers with different modes can help you achieve the most realistic of shades.

Not intended specifically as a tutorial it is just to illustrate a live working image and colouring in use If you do require a tutorial on colouring you should visit he blog

Colouring and Tinting a photo Tutorial

and to see the actual photo used in the short video see the blog post digitally coloured photos and some history

If you search the blog for “colouring” you will get many results back so browse through them and you will be certain to pick up some tips. If you wanted to see our main page outlining more colouring techniques see colouring a black and white photo.

Summary
Article Name
Colouring an image with multiple blend modes and colours
Description
A quick look at one part of the process of colouring an old photo with blend modes and coloured layers. There are no set rules about which blend modes to choose when trying to colour an image.
Neil Rhodes
Image-restore.co.uk
Image-Restore.co.uk
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